CHIP Student Handbook for classes prior to Class of 2017



C.H.I.P. Guidelines for Classes Prior to Class of 2017

July 2013


Service-Learning LCME Requirements:
IS-14-A. An institution that offers a medical education program should make available sufficient opportunities for medical students to participate in service-learning activities and should encourage and support medical student participation.

Principle
Mission:  The Community Health Initiative Phoenix (CHIP) provides medical students with experiences to work with underserved populations in clinical and educational settings.  Through this work, students learn the impact of socioeconomic status and cultural barriers on health and access to health care.  Medical students also experience the many key roles physicians play in the lives of their patients.  CHIP also provides opportunities to experience leadership through the development and operation of programs.

Teaching and Learning Objectives:

Although participation in CHIP is purely voluntary, we endeavor to maintain rigor in education and commitment in our CHIP programs. Therefore, we have identified these as objectives that students will achieve should they participate in CHIP:

  1. Provide medical care, under the supervision of an attending physician, to people who are medically underserved or disadvantaged.
  2. Provide education about medically relevant topics to undereducated people, whose expansion of knowledge could significantly improve the overall health of the individuals and the community.
  3. Understand the issues faced by people who are socially and/or medically disadvantaged in the access to health care.
  4. Identify the physician’s role and leadership in assisting disadvantaged people and communities.
  5. Develop leadership skills in working with a team of care providers.
  6. As 3rd and 4th years, mentor 1st and 2nd year medical students in providing care and educational services for these populations.
  7. By the end of 4th year, demonstrate the skills necessary to work effectively with medically underserved and disadvantaged people.
  8. Advocate for improved access to health care and social services.

Organization:

It is important that the CHIP projects and programs are experiences chosen, developed, and directed by students themselves under the supervision and guidance of the CHIP Faculty Advisor.  In general, the following guidelines should be met:

  1. The program and site should serve a medically underserved population, defined as
    1. Populations with low socioeconomic status, homeless, or lack health insurance.
    2. Public or charter schools in which greater than 50% receive federally subsidized school lunch programs.       
    3. Populations that lack geographic access to care or who live in disadvantaged areas.
  2. A program may prefer certain students, but students cannot be excluded based on race, religion, gender or sexual orientation.  Certain programs may request that only female students attend, for the comfort and preferences of the patients – an accommodation that can be considered.
  3. The site cannot discriminate against clients or students for any reason.
  4. The site or organization cannot compel or otherwise require patients to be subject to any political, religious, or other dialogue as an aspect of the care/service provided.
  5. Sites must abide by HIPAA and other appropriate regulations.
  6. Supervision of students is provided by licensed professionals who have training appropriate for the supervision provided.
  7. Sites providing service must be licensed, certified, or officially recognized by the appropriate agency.
  8. Written and approved learning objectives appropriate for the University of Arizona’s College of Medicine-Phoenix curriculum must guide the acquisition of knowledge, attitudes, and skills at the program/site.
  9. Services, patient/client education, and other information provided by the participating program must be based on accurate and current science.
  10. Programs must be developed in response to student interest and require student leadership and support.
  11. Programs may not interfere with the academic coursework schedules of medical students.
Distinction in Community Service and Credit:

All classes prior to the Class of 2017 can earn credit toward graduation and Distinction in Community Service on their transcripts by fulfilling the requirements listed below. The curriculum for the Class of 2017 is still being developed. The new curriculum will most likely have the same hour criteria but different additional requirements to earn credit and Distinction.

 

CHIP I

  1. CHIP I is open only to 1st and 2nd year students.
  2. Students must attend an orientation and sign up to be eligible to participate in CHIP activities in the fall of the academic year (usually in October or November).
  3. Students must attend a clinical skills workshop and demonstrate competency in injection and phlebotomy.
  4. Students must pass the head-to-toe exam in the Doctoring course in the capstone week of the first block.
  5. Individual programs within CHIP may require an additional orientation before students can start working in those programs.
  6. For CHIP I, students must accumulate 45 hours of service for one credit and 90 hours of service for two credits and complete a 3-5 page reflective paper on their CHIP I experience.  
  7. Hours of service may be accumulated right up to the first day of their third year of medical school.  
  8. Credits earned in CHIP I will be reflected on the student’s transcript but will not apply to any graduation requirements.
  9. The paper is to be submitted to Dr. Briney via email by April of the second year of medical school.
  10. The completion of CHIP I is a prerequisite for CHIP II.

Summer CHIP Activity

First year students are not officially registered with the College of Medicine between 1st and 2nd years of medical school.  If a student chooses to continue clinical CHIP activities during the summer between the 1st and 2nd year of medical school (and also ensure the University of Arizona will cover medical liability), the student must ensure the following items are completed:

1.      Provide written documentation of goals & objectives for the summer rotation to the Faculty Advisor in Spring of MSI.

2.      Provide written documentation summarizing summer CHIP activities to the Faculty Advisor before the first day of MSII.


CHIP II

  1. Likewise, for CHIP II, students must accumulate 45 hours of service for one credit and 90 hours of service for two credits and complete a 3-5 page reflective paper on their CHIP II experience.
  2. Credits earned in CHIP II may be counted toward elective credit requirements for graduation.
  3. Hours of service may be accumulated and reported one week prior to graduation.  
  4. Credits earned in CHIP II will be reflected on the student’s transcript and may apply to elective credit requirements.  
  5. The paper is to be submitted to Dr. Briney via email by April of the fourth year of medical school.
  6. Enrollment in CHIP II is dependent on the completion of CHIP I or at the discretion of the course director.

Distinction in Community Service requirements:

  1. Students wishing Distinction in Community Service to be reflected on their transcripts, will need to complete 90 hours of service in CHIP I and 90 hours of service in CUP II.
  2. Instead of the 3-5 page paper described in the prior section, the student will submit a 10 page reflective paper with the following requirements:
a. Discuss the topic and outline with Dr. Briney by March of the fourth year.
b. Discuss the student’s personal reactions and thoughts about CHIP experiences and the underserved people with whom they have worked. Students also should recount and assess their learning through the CHIP program and describe how they will apply this learning in future medical practice.
c. Discuss some issue(s) in some depth regarding medically underserved and socially disadvantaged populations, and make application to the students’ experiences in the CHIP program.
d. Citations (APA-style) to the medical/social science literature must be provided in the body of the paper and in a bibliography.
      3. Of note, the opportunity to receive Distinction in Community Service remains at the prerogative of the Dean. 

 

Hours

It is the responsibility of the individual program leaders to submit their participants’ hours. The decision to dock hours from students who do not show up for their scheduled shifts is at the discretion of the individual leaders. Sign-up policies, including whether or not hours will be docked for absences, must be clearly stated on either the CHIP website or the program’s sign-up document. We expect the policies of each group to be fair and consistent with the goals of CHIP. Any disagreements or hour inconsistencies should be brought to the CHIP Student Director as necessary.

 

Signing up for CHIP:

1.      Students must attend an orientation and register to be eligible to participate in CHIP activities.

2.      Students must submit a registration fee – this money is used for the clinical skills workshop and to offset costs of CHIP programs throughout the year. CHIP does not operate for profit.

3.      Students must attend the clinical skills workshop and demonstrate competency in injection and phlebotomy. Orientation and the clinical skills workshop generally take place in September.

4.      For educational-only programs e.g. New Hope Teen Pregnancy Program, Tar Wars, Wesley Tutoring, Medical Student Mentorship Program, and Chest Compressions Only CPR it is not necessary to complete the clinical skills workshop before volunteering. However, students still need to register before they can participate.

5.      Individual programs within CHIP may require an additional orientation before students can start working in those programs.


Starting a new CHIP Program:

Students have the opportunity to begin new CHIP programs based on a need they see in the community. It is important that the CHIP projects and programs are experiences chosen, developed, and directed by students themselves under the supervision and guidance of the CHIP Faculty Advisor. It is the responsibility of the student to develop a mission and learning objectives for their program that are consistent with CHIP’s overall learning objectives and general organization. The mission and learning objectives are submitted to and approved by the CHIP Faculty Advisor and Student Director. The Faculty Advisor and Student Director may require changes to the mission and/or learning objectives before a program can be approved. The steps for starting a CHIP program are outlined below.

  1. Identify a community need: Dr. Briney (sbriney@email.arizona.edu can help with this, if needed, as community members often contact her to request services.  You can also identify an opportunity in your own community, CCE, rotations, or even as part of your SP.
  2. Identify a plan: What services do you want to provide, how often, what location, who will oversee this activity? All CHIP activities should be available to all students.
  3. Identify the people and supplies that will be instrumental in your program.  We need to know where the activity will take place and will need an address/business name/point of contact for the legal forms that will need to be completed prior to participation.
  4. Create learning objectives; this is important as all service learning activities must be linked to the curriculum in some way, and this allows us to do that.
  5. Students will need to submit a form with the above information 1-2 months prior to participation in order to develop an affiliation agreement between UA and the site.  Sara Hillman (shillman@email.arizona.edu) can help with this step.
  6. Once the agreement is in place, we can start allowing students to participate. The new program leader should plan an orientation for student volunteers:  meeting, online material, email, or phone call.

 


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